Category Archives: Slice of Life

How fear can be helpful as a motivator An honest reflection on motherhood and preparedness

NADINE RIOPEL

The day my pregnancy test read positive, I cried. They were not tears of joy. While this was a planned pregnancy, I was terrified.

Although I had never pictured myself with kids, when my husband and I were dating, we decided to have a family.

But I was scared. Not of pregnancy and labour, although they were pretty unpleasant. I was afraid of the transformational, irrevocable life change everyone kept talking about. I was in my mid-thirties, well into my professional career and personal development. I wasn’t interested in being totally “transformed”.

Continue reading How fear can be helpful as a motivator An honest reflection on motherhood and preparedness

Job hunting isn’t for the faint of heart How I keep my cool when the odds are against me

I’ve been looking for work to supplement my income. I’m an older university educated woman, and am not ready to be put out to pasture. I’m job hunting in an area where people drop out of high school for that well-paying blue collar job. Continue reading Job hunting isn’t for the faint of heart How I keep my cool when the odds are against me

Hugging regularly brings health and happiness Physical contact helps us bond with our loved ones

Science backs up what we all know intuitively: touch not only feels good, it is essential to our emotional and physical well-being.

Touching is fundamental to human communication, bonding, and health. It calms cardiovascular stress. It evokes safety and trust. It stimulates the brain to release feel-good chemicals that we produce naturally to encourage such behaviour (serotonin, dopamine and endorphins). Continue reading Hugging regularly brings health and happiness Physical contact helps us bond with our loved ones

The work really is never done on a farm What it means to work on an organic farm in Colombia

Farming in Colombia so near the equator sheds a whole new meaning on the cliché, “early to bed, early to rise.” The sun sets around 5:40 and rises 12 hours later, give or take a few minutes. I cannot recall the last time I was asleep by 7:30 p.m., let alone night after night. I’m here working as a volunteer.

Continue reading The work really is never done on a farm What it means to work on an organic farm in Colombia

Advice to keep your relationships alive Ensuring your loved ones remain a priority

Lover, friendship, or family members: all of these connections take effort to maintain and blossom. Without attention, these important relationships will fall apart.

This February, Rat Creek Press contributors took the time to share what they do to keep their relationships going.

Continue reading Advice to keep your relationships alive Ensuring your loved ones remain a priority

Blowing soap bubbles on my 63rd birthday Considering some philosophical questions about life

A journalist once asked Albert Einstein: “What is the most important question we can ask?”

Einstein replied: “Is the universe a safe place?”

That’s a big question. I am not sure how I would answer it. But since I am at the reflective stage of life, it seems like a good time to give it some consideration.

Continue reading Blowing soap bubbles on my 63rd birthday Considering some philosophical questions about life

Ringing in the new year around the world The different ways cultures hope for a better year

My mother always told me to be careful about what I did on New Year’s Eve because that is what I would be doing all year round. (What a good reason to avoid the dishes!) Here in North America, we usually celebrate New Year’s Eve with fireworks, champagne, and a midnight kiss. But how does the rest of the world ring in the new year? Most traditions are designed to attract prosperity and good fortune in the coming year.

Continue reading Ringing in the new year around the world The different ways cultures hope for a better year

Letter Re: Army recruits photo in August issue

In the photo where the men walk down Alberta Avenue supporting the war effort, the two ladies rolling up the awning in front of Smith Bakery are Selina Smith, Francis Smith’s wife, and Ruth Smith, his daughter. His daughter Ethel Smith and niece Edna Ore were also working in the bake shop.
Information provided by Francis Smith’s granddaughters Barbara and Frances.

What it means to start over in a new country Learning a complicated language takes time and exposure

Imagine moving to a new country. The stress of finding a new home, a new job, a new school for your kids, and new friends. Now imagine not being able to speak your new country’s language.

Continue reading What it means to start over in a new country Learning a complicated language takes time and exposure