Stretching the food budget Creative ways to grow food, save money and stay healthy

It’s no secret that food costs have increased. For some, that jump has barely registered, but for many of us, it has impacted our budgets noticeably. What has caused food prices to soar? Where does that leave those of us with tight finances? Are there alternatives to purchasing expensive fresh fruits and vegetables?

Part of the reason food costs have risen is because of the high price of oil. Large-scale farms require machinery to mechanically harvest products and the cost of transport has also increased. Climate change is another culprit, with floods, droughts, and storms in various areas destroying harvests. The low Canadian dollar is another, more recent factor. Finally, some governments have banned exports of foods, fearing shortages and ensuing political instability. Such bans mean low supply and correspondingly higher prices.

Continue reading Stretching the food budget Creative ways to grow food, save money and stay healthy

Welcoming Syrian refugees How a group banded together to help a refugee family

Kathryn Rambow is still dragging around that cold. There has been no time to recuperate. A refugee family—the first installment—arrives on the plane tomorrow.

Rambow, an Alberta Avenue resident, has been busy ensuring a two bedroom apartment is outfitted for a young family of four. Rambow is part of the Refugee Response Group, a few dozen people (some local) who connected to welcome Syrian refugees.

Continue reading Welcoming Syrian refugees How a group banded together to help a refugee family

Striving for the Olympic Games Parkdale resident and sabre fencer proves that dedication pays off

Nine years ago, Parkdale resident Marissa Ponich didn’t know much about sabres, a cavalry weapon used on horseback long ago.

Andrew Rusheleau, Ponich’s then-boyfriend (now husband) introduced her to sabre fencing when she was attending the University of Alberta. She came to love the sport under the guidance of coach Sergei Kazimirski, founder of Sergei’s Sabre Club.

Today she’s one of the top women’s sabre fencers in Canada.

Continue reading Striving for the Olympic Games Parkdale resident and sabre fencer proves that dedication pays off

Gotta story? Go digital! The Nina’s Digital Storytelling project guides storytellers through the process

The Nina (n-eye-na) is an art-making centre for adults with developmental disabilities. If you have ever walked by and looked through our windows during the week, you likely saw a room full of people drawing and painting. If you came through the doors to visit, you probably saw our textile, ceramics, and printing studios bursting with activity. Over 170 people belong to the Nina’s collective of artists.

At the Nina, we love being part of Alberta Avenue’s thriving art scene and we offer free drop-in Community Art Nights on Tuesdays and Family Art Nights on Wednesdays for anyone wanting to create art. In the Stollery Gallery, we host 15 or more exhibits a year from other groups and individuals as well as Nina artists.

Now there’s a new project that’s all about community, and we’d like to invite you to join us.

Continue reading Gotta story? Go digital! The Nina’s Digital Storytelling project guides storytellers through the process

Caring for St. Patrick’s Church Father Stempfle has been the resident priest at St. Patrick’s Church for 38 years

St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church is a quiet oasis of kindness and caring. An integral part of the church is Father Frank Stempfle, who has been a priest for over 60 years.

Stempfle was born in 1926 and lived on a farm near Strome, Alberta. He later resided in Primate, Saskatchewan, before returning to Alberta to live on a farm near Hayter.

He was inspired to enter the clergy by the priests he came into contact with as a boy and young man. “We had a very fine parish priest when I was growing up,” said Stempfle. Later on, he attended St. Anthony’s College in Edmonton where he was influenced by the Franciscan priests who ran the school. He spent seven years at St. Joseph Seminary and was ordained in 1952 by Archbishop John Hugh MacDonald.

Continue reading Caring for St. Patrick’s Church Father Stempfle has been the resident priest at St. Patrick’s Church for 38 years

Northlands’ new vision Proposed changes are both innovative and risky

The clock is ticking to determine the future of the aging hockey arena and the entire Northlands site.

Northlands’ proposed Vision 2020 strategy for its 160-acre “campus” is a huge gamble. On one hand, it’s a $165-million-dollar “re-creation of recreation,” marked by massive changes to its three main venues. On the other is the spectre of a derelict site inspiring falling housing values and increased crime.

“We don’t want Vision 2020 to be an all-or-nothing strategy, but we also don’t want Northlands to be the next not-for-profit society that is $20-million-dollars in the hole and no way to pay it back,” President and CEO Tim Reid told community league members in February.

Continue reading Northlands’ new vision Proposed changes are both innovative and risky

Readers support Rat Creek Advertisers Letter to the editor

Some months ago, I believe you ran a story about a local female plumber. Would you be able let me know who that was and/or the name of her plumbing company? Thank you.

Keep up the good work, by the way. We pick up a copy of your paper every edition and yes, we try to give business to advertisers in your paper when we can. Hope the Rat Creek Press remains running for many years to come.

Greg Pang
RedFrame Law

Concerns about Northlands’ new vision Letter to the editor

The Northlands Park Vision 2020, particularly the outdoor concert space they are planning, will affect the horse racing community and people that live and work at the racetrack. This is a place that is more than an industry. It is a family, a way of life, and more importantly, a historic place that has been functioning in this city for over 100 years, 30 of mine.

My neighbourhood deals with issues like noise and parking. Patrons from Northlands Park currently do not respect the neighbourhood and the parking laws within it. If they intend to hold concerts/festivals that have an attendance of upward of 140,000 people, just think of the issues that will come with this type of traffic.

I hope to see in the next issue some information on how this will affect the communities that surround Northlands Park.

April Welch
A concerned resident and horse racing advocate